Milk Tart

Recipe from https://www.africanbites.com/milk-tart/

The children and I have been scouring the internet for the best recipes from around the world! COVID-19 won’t stop us from “visiting” different countries and learning about them. Our favorite way to explore new places is through desserts! We’d love you to join us on our journey and watch our videos as we will teach you about a new place and then show you how to make one of their most popular desserts. Scroll to the bottom for the link to the recipe and to the video.

This Milk Tart recipe is a huge winner in our house. Thumbs up across the board for this sweet pie crust that’s filled with what I describe as a sweet, cinnamon and nutmeg infused pudding. It’s smooth and the warm spices in the milk really come through and taste divine. It’s served chilled, which is important to us as we are dealing with temperatures of 110 degrees F here in AZ. Added bonus, it’s super easy to make!

Milk Tart is a popular South African dessert. The country of South Africa is located, just like it sounds, at the southern tip of the continent of Africa. In all of Africa, there are over 2,000 languages spoken. South Africa has 11 official languages. Many of its residents speak several languages fluently. I find this fascinating. I am fluent in only one language. For years I’ve been working on improving my Spanish, but I’m nowhere near fluent.

Another interesting fact about South Africa, is it’s main water source comes from the snow-capped peaks of Lesotho. Lesotho is a tiny country that is located entirely within the borders of South Africa. Its nickname is “Kingdom of the Sky” because the whole country is located over 1,000 meters above sea level. So wild.

Speaking of wild, Africa is well known for it’s wildlife. South Africa only accounts for about 1% of the Earth’s land mass, and yet it is home to an abundant amount of wildlife. Ranging from birds, fish, and plants, to mammal and reptile species. The country also works very hard to preserve its wildlife. Dozens of it’s animals have become endangered and are nearing extinction due to illegal hunting and habitat loss. To learn more and find ways you can help, check out African Wildlife Foundation, or awf.org.

Now, the past is so important to our future and I try to teach that to my kids as much as possible. The world is much like a child, continuously growing and learning from its mistakes and our successes. Constantly striving to be even greater. So I’d like to briefly discuss South Africa’s past.

Some of the earliest human fossils ever found, which date back over 2 million years, were uncovered in the limestone caves of Sterkfontein. This cave formation is in northern South Africa, near Johannesburg. These great discoveries have earned it the nickname, “Cradle of Humankind.” (NatGeo Kids, Facts About South Africa)

In the 1400s, European ships began stopping off on the coast of South Africa to load up on supplies before continuing their journeys elsewhere. In 1652, the Netherlands established the southern city of Cape Town, and Dutch farmers began settling there. Then, because of wars happening in Europe, the British gained control of the Cape Town colony in 1806.

In 1910, the British joined four colonies and created South Africa. This was the beginning of apartheid, a practice of segregation separating whites from black South Africans. This lead to decades of conflict.

In 1963, one of South Africa’s most prominent leaders and the head of the anti-apartheid African National Congress, Nelson Mandala, received a life sentence in prison for alleged “terrorist” activities. He worked tirelessly on abolishing the unjust apartheid policies. After 27 years in prison, he was finally freed. In 1993, he received the Nobel Peace Prize for his human rights work. In 1994, he was elected President of South Africa and it wasn’t until then that apartheid was finally abolished. 1994! That was not that long ago, I was 11 years old! People my age lived through that period of time. https://www.natgeokids.com/uk/discover/geography/countries/facts-about-south-africa/

After learning only a small amount about South Africa, we hope it makes you want to learn more! We are providing a list of books that are set in South Africa. You can find more about this list at https://coloursofus.com/23-childrens-books-set-south-africa/. This website also has toys, clothes, and more! Check it out. Look for these books at your local library, bookstore, or on Amazon.

Preschool Books:

  • Not So Fast, Songololo by Niki Daly
  • At the Crossroads by Rachel Isadora
  • Jamela’s Dress by Niki Daly
  • Halala Means Welcome!: a book of Zulu words by Ken Wilson-Max
  • Somewhere in Africa by Ingrid Mennen
  • S is for South Africa (World Alphabets) by Beverely Naidoo
  • One Child, One Seed: A South African Counting Book by Kathryn Cave
  • Gift of the Sun: A Tale from South Africa by Dianne Stewart
  • A South African Night by Rachel Isadora
  • My Painted House, My Friendly Chickenm and Me by Maya Angelou

Elementary Books:

  • Count Your Way Through South Africa by James Haskins
  • The Mother of Monsters by Fran Parnell
  • The Herd Boy by Niki Daly
  • Once Upon a Time by Niki Daly
  • Armien’s Fishing Trip by Catherine Stock
  • The Day Gogo Went to Vote by Elinor Batezat Sisulu
  • Goal! by Mina Javaherbin
  • The Soccer Fence by Phil Bildner
  • Nelson Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom by Chris van Wyk

Middle School and High School:

  • Journey to Jo’burg: A South African Story by Beverely Naidoo
  • South Africa (Enchantment of the World) by Ettagale Blauer
  • Zulu Dog by Anton Ferreira
  • Nelson Mandela: The Authorized Comic Book by The Nelson Mandela Foundation

Now, for the recipe!

Kitchen tools you will need:

  • 9″ springform pan or 9″ removable bottom tart pan
  • food processor
  • small saucepan
  • whisk

Print out the ingredients and steps you need from here:

https://www.africanbites.com/milk-tart/

Watch our short lesson about South Africa and see us make this 2 part recipe for delicious Milk Tart here:

Rating: 5 out of 5.

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